Category Archives: Addiction

Are there animals in YOUR medicine cabinet?

Dog and pills.How have animals helped YOU today? If you’re not familiar with research, you might not have any idea. But did you know that most of our medical advances wouldn’t have been possible without animals? It’s amazing to learn about the ways they’ve helped us!

Antibiotic ointment, aspirin, cold medicines, penicillin, anti-depressants, blood pressure and cholesterol medications, insulin, anti-coagulants, anesthesia, HIV drugs, chemotherapy, dialysis, CT scans, MRIs, prosthetics, organ transplants, and thousands of other medications and procedures were developed and determined to be safe for your use, thanks to dedicated researchers and the animals they work with.

The list goes on.┬áI will guarantee that every person reading this has benefited from at least some of these advances. What’s more, I’ll bet your pets have benefited as well! And that’s a wonderful thing! Think of the symptoms we can alleviate due to medications, the life-threatening emergencies that we can SURVIVE, and the illnesses that our children may never get, thanks to vaccines. Polio, measles, cervical cancer, rabies, chicken pox, whooping cough, tetanus, Hepatitis B- and that’s just the beginning of the list!

EMBRACE it. Be thankful for it. The next time you reach into your medicine cabinet, take a minute to think about the scientific advances that led to the development of the medication that’s about to help you!

http://news.discovery.com/animals/animals-in-your-medicine-cabinet-photos-140204.htm

http://fbresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/AADflyer-hires.pdf

Third-hand smoke just as dangerous as actually smoking?

Smoking killsFirst-hand smoke exposure is the smoke inhaled by the actual smoker, and second-hand smoke exposure is when others inhale the exhaled smoke. But according to new research, third-hand smoke exposure could be just as dangerous as first- and second-hand smoke.

Third-hand smoke exposure is exposure to surfaces that have been contaminated with second-hand smoke. When a smoker moves out of a house, surfaces and dust can remain contaminated. As time goes on, nicotine is re-emitted from the contamination, and nicotine exposure can approach the levels of first-hand smoking.

Mice exposed to third-hand smoke were hyperactive, experienced significant lung and liver damage, and their wound healing abilities were reduced. In addition to these findings, it was found that third-hand smoke exposure can lead to type II diabetes!

What does this mean for you? Well, it might be more important than you think to choose a hotel that prohibits smoking and pay more attention to the smoking habits of previous owners of your new homes and automobiles. While a lingering odor of smoke might dissipate over time, the lasting effects may not. If you’re still smoking, here’s another great reason to consider the effects you may be having on your kids, your friends’ kids, and those who will be here long after you are.

http://ucrtoday.ucr.edu/20236

Cocaine-using males have offspring that resist addictive behaviors

cocaine cutting drugs addictionResearch at the University of Pennsylvania showed that male offspring of male rats that used cocaine were less likely to become addicted to the drug after having experienced it, and less likely to want the drug in the first place. Researchers found that cocaine use among males likely causes changes in the DNA that are transmitted to male offspring!

It seems that the neurons of the male offspring were less sensitive to cocaine. Normally, after repeated cocaine use, certain receptors in the brain are usually remodeled; this is part of the development of addiction. But in these male offspring, that didn’t happen.

This is important, because it will be interesting to see how these changes in behavior are passed down from generation to generation. Interestingly, this type of ‘immunity’ to addiction wasn’t seen in female offspring. Understanding the mechanisms behind this could potentially help lead to treatments for addiction.

Read more:

http://www.uphs.upenn.edu/news/News_Releases/2013/11/wimmer/