Category Archives: Ovarian Cancer

Ovarian cancer patients experiencing fewer toxic effects from chemo!

Medical Team Meeting With Couple In Hospital RoomA clinical trial in human patients with ovarian cancer has shown some promising results. All patients in this study were undergoing chemotherapy, but some received high doses of intravenous vitamin C as well. After following these patients for five years, it was found that the patients who received vitamin C experienced fewer toxic effects from chemo!

That’s pretty good news. And this is an interesting example of animal research at work. Years ago, oral doses of vitamin C weren’t found to be effective. But by working with a combination of cell cultures and animals, researchers were able to determine that IV doses could be much more effective than oral doses, and they found that at high doses, vitamin C can kill cancer cells without harming normal cells. Often, drugs administered by different routes can work in different ways- when taken orally, vitamin C is often absorbed quickly and doesn’t stay in your system for long. So animals played a big role in understanding the proper route of administration, and now human patients will be seeing the benefits of that work!

Now that safety and toxicity studies have been performed, expect to see this therapy introduced into further clinical trials! Are you interested in clinical trials in your area? Go to www.clinicaltrials.gov!

Read more:

http://www.kumc.edu/news-listing-page/intravenous-ascorbate-with-chemotherapy.html

Are there animals in YOUR medicine cabinet?

Dog and pills.How have animals helped YOU today? If you’re not familiar with research, you might not have any idea. But did you know that most of our medical advances wouldn’t have been possible without animals? It’s amazing to learn about the ways they’ve helped us!

Antibiotic ointment, aspirin, cold medicines, penicillin, anti-depressants, blood pressure and cholesterol medications, insulin, anti-coagulants, anesthesia, HIV drugs, chemotherapy, dialysis, CT scans, MRIs, prosthetics, organ transplants, and thousands of other medications and procedures were developed and determined to be safe for your use, thanks to dedicated researchers and the animals they work with.

The list goes on. I will guarantee that every person reading this has benefited from at least some of these advances. What’s more, I’ll bet your pets have benefited as well! And that’s a wonderful thing! Think of the symptoms we can alleviate due to medications, the life-threatening emergencies that we can SURVIVE, and the illnesses that our children may never get, thanks to vaccines. Polio, measles, cervical cancer, rabies, chicken pox, whooping cough, tetanus, Hepatitis B- and that’s just the beginning of the list!

EMBRACE it. Be thankful for it. The next time you reach into your medicine cabinet, take a minute to think about the scientific advances that led to the development of the medication that’s about to help you!

http://news.discovery.com/animals/animals-in-your-medicine-cabinet-photos-140204.htm

http://fbresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/AADflyer-hires.pdf

Ovarian cancer: Could you be saved by a dog?

Sad puppyOver 14,000 women die each year from ovarian cancer, which often avoids detection until it has spread. At the University of Pennsylvania, researchers are working hard to train dogs to detect ovarian cancer. The hope is that through studying disease-detecting capabilities in dogs, researchers will be able to develop a sensor that can detect cancer at early stages. With a sense of smell about a million times superior to a human’s, dogs have been used to detect bombs, drugs, insect infestations, and low blood sugar in diabetics. The dogs at U Penn are highly accurate at correctly identifying samples containing cancer cells. The goal is to study how the dogs identify these signals from different types of ovarian cancer samples and different compounds that change in ovarian cancer, and hopefully use this information to develop technology that could change a cancer patient’s prognosis through early detection. Talk about research in animals benefiting people- this is awesome!

http://articles.philly.com/2013-08-19/news/41422802_1_cancer-detection-three-dogs-research-project